A good book for children should simply be егэ

Раздел 1. аудированиевы услышите 6 высказываний. установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего af и утверждениями, данными в списке 17. используйте

Раздел 1. АУДИРОВАНИЕ

Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего A—F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1—7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей цифрой, только один раз. В задании есть одно лишнее утверждение. Вы услышите запись дважды. Занесите свои ответы в таблицу.

2

Вы услышите диалог. Определите, какие из приведённых утверждений А—G соответствуют содержанию текста (1 — True), какие не соответствуют (2 — False) и о чём в тексте не сказано, то есть на основании текста нельзя дать ни положительного, ни отрицательного ответа (3 — Not stated). Занесите номер выбранного вами варианта ответа в таблицу. Вы услышите запись дважды.

A The Armoury is situated near the Kremlin.

B Originally the Kremlin was wooden.

C New walls and towers of red brick were built in the 15th century.

D The Trinity Gate leads to Red Square.

E The monument to Minin and Pozharsky is the oldest in Moscow.

F The monument to Alexander Pushkin is not far from the monument to Yuri Dolgoruky.

G You can watch ballets in the Maly Theatre.

Утверждение

Соответствие диалогу

Вы услышите интервью с автором детективных романов. В заданиях 3—9 запишите в поле ответа цифру 1, 2 или 3, соответствующую выбранному Вами варианту ответа. Вы услышите запись дважды.

3

Which benefit of trees has not been mentioned by the speaker?
1) Protection from flooding.
2) Protection from the sun’s rays.
3) Protection from precipitation.
Ответ: .

4

The smell of pines in the forest is the result of trees releasing

1) oxygen.

2) carbon dioxide.

3) other gasses.

Ответ: .

5

Scientists want to study how
1) gasses are released by trees into the atmosphere.
2) organic compounds form tiny particles.
3) these particles influence the climate.
Ответ: .

6

Cloud droplets are unable to

1) absorb solar radiation.

2) reflect solar radiation.

3) scatter solar radiation.

Ответ: .

7

According to scientists, cloud droplets influence

1) the size of the cloud.

2) the colour of the cloud.

3) the movement of the cloud.

Ответ: .

8

The actual formation of the clouds is governed
1) only by the formation of cloud droplets.
2) primarily by the formation of cloud droplets.
3) by several different processes.
Ответ: .

9

A new way of addressing the problem of global warming is by reducing the amount of
1) greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere.
2) the sun’s radiation getting through the atmosphere.
3) the sun’s radiation reflected by the clouds.
Ответ: .

Раздел 2. ЧТЕНИЕ

10

Установите соответствие между заголовками 1—8 и текстами A—G. Занесите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую цифру только один раз. В задании один заголовок лишний.

1. Exotic Pets
2. Going Back in Time
3. Small Screen Addiction
4. Body Language

5. Massive Destruction
6. Buried Treasure
7. Reason for Extinction
8. Intelligent Enemies

A. The VLT (Very Large Telescope) is the world’s largest telescope and it is taking scientists further back to the Big Bang than they ever thought possible. In other words, the VLT is a kind of a time machine, giving astronomers detailed views of events that took place in the earliest days of the cosmos. One day, we will have a much clearer picture of how our planet was born.

B. The latest development in the debate amongst scientists about what killed the prehistoric dinosaurs is the suggestion that acid rain was the cause. Some geologists suggest that a large meteor hitting the earth at 65 kilometres per second would have led to strongly acidic rain falling all over the world. This idea is fascinating but it would mean the dinosaurs would all have died within a very short time.

C. In 1948, a British farmer discovered an interesting lump of metal while ploughing his field. At first he thought the metal bits were parts of an old bed. Then more ‘parts of old beds’ turned up and the farmer took them to the local museum. ‘But these bits are priceless!’ exclaimed the keeper of the museum. ‘They are Iron Age jewellery and coins!’ Over the next 40 years, more and more items were found in the same field.

D. Rats may have had a bit of a hard time over the years but these days lots of people are forgetting about guinea-pigs and hamsters and are buying rats instead. Domestic rats aren’t the same as the ones that run around rubbish bins — they’re actually quite cute. They are very intelligent and can be trained like dogs. They come in different colours and — a big bonus — they will eat anything!

E. In Western cultures, people look each other in the eye during a conversation to show interest and trust, but in many Asian countries, it’s rude to look people in the eye, especially a superior such as a teacher. One of the most basic and powerful signals is when a person crosses his or her arms across the chest. This can indicate that a person is putting up an unconscious barrier between themselves and others.

F. Earthquakes happen all the time in all parts of the world but we don’t notice most of them because they are small. However, big earthquakes are really dangerous. They can make buildings fall down, set off landslides and do other deadly things. The highest death toll caused by an earthquake was in China in 1556, when at least 830,000 people died.

G. According to scientists, Americans watch more TV on average than any other nationality. In fact, many people, particularly children, sit for 35 hours or more per week glued to the box. What’s wrong with watching all that TV? Studies have linked it to everything from obesity to aggression in children not to mention that it puts your mind into a sort of sedated state. Habitual television watching, over long periods of time, has been known to cause depression, and anger.

11

Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A—F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1—7. Одна из частей в списке 1—7 лишняя. Занесите цифру, обозначающую соответствующую часть предложения, в таблицу.

The Man Booker Prize for Fiction is awarded every year for the best original full-length novel written by a writer from the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland. It aims to represent the greatest in contemporary literature and promotes the finest in fiction by rewarding the best book of the year. The prize was originally called the Booker-McConnell Prize, A ____________. However, it was better-known as simply the ‘Booker Prize’. In 2002, the Man Group became the sponsor and they chose the new name, keeping ‘Booker’.

Publishers can submit books for consideration for the prize, but the judges can also ask for books to be submitted B ____________. Firstly, the Advisory Committee gives advice if there have been any changes to the rules for the prize. Then it selects the people C ____________. The judging panel changes every year and usually a person is only a judge once.

Great efforts are made to ensure that the judging panel is balanced in terms of gender and professions within the industry. A writer, a critic, an editor and an academic are chosen along with a well-known person from wider society. However, when the panel of judges has been finalized, they are left to make their own decisions D ____________. The Man Booker judges include critics, writers and academics E ____________. The influence of the prize is so great that the winner will almost certainly see the considerable sales increase, in addition to the £50,000 F ____________. In 1992, a Booker Russian Novel Prize was introduced.

  1. without any further interference from the prize sponsor
  2. so as to maintain the consistent quality of the prize
  3. who will judge the books
  4. so as to sell them
  5. which was the name of the company that sponsored it
  6. that comes with the prize
  7. they think should be included

Прочитайте текст и выполните задания 12—18. В каждом задании запишите в поле ответа цифру 1, 2, 3 или 4, соответствующую выбранному Вами варианту ответа.

‘Have you written a letter to the Froplinsons?’ asked Egbert.

‘No,’ said Janetta, with a note of tired defiance in her voice; ‘I’ve written eleven letters today expressing surprise and gratitude for sundry unmerited gifts, but I haven’t written to the Froplinsons yet.’

‘Someone will have to do it,’ said Egbert.

‘I don’t dispute the necessity, but I don’t think that someone should be me,’ said Janetta. ‘I wouldn’t mind writing a letter of angry recrimination or heartless satire to some suitable recipient. In fact, I should rather enjoy it, but I’ve come to the end of my capacity for expressing servile amiability. Eleven letters today and nine yesterday, all couched in the same strain of ecstatic thankfulness: really, you can’t expect me to sit down to another. There is such a thing as writing oneself out.’

‘I’ve written nearly as many,’ said Egbert, ‘and I’ve had my usual business correspondence to get through, too. Besides, I don’t know what it was that the Froplinsons sent us.’ ‘A William the Conqueror calendar,’ said Janetta, ‘with a quotation of one of his great thoughts for every day in the year.’

‘Impossible,’ said Egbert; ‘he didn’t have three hundred and sixty-five thoughts in the whole of his life, or, if he did, he kept them to himself.’

‘Well, it was William Wordsworth, then,’ said Janetta; ‘I know William came into it somewhere.’

‘That sounds more probable,’ said Egbert; ‘well, let’s collaborate on this letter and get it done. I’ll dictate, and you can scribble it down. ‘Dear Mrs. Froplinson, thank you and your husband so much for the very pretty calendar you sent us. It was very good of you to think of us.’ ’

‘You can’t possibly say that,’ said Janetta, laying down her pen. ‘We sent them something on the twenty-second,’ said Janetta, ‘so they simply had to think of us. There was no getting away from it.’

‘What did we send them?’ asked Egbert gloomily.

‘Bridge-markers,’ said Janetta, ‘in a cardboard case, with some inanity about ‘digging for fortune with a royal spade’ emblazoned on the cover. The moment I saw it in the shop I said to myself ‘Froplinsons’ and to the attendant ‘How much?’ When he said ‘Ninepence,’ I gave him their address, jabbed our card in, paid tenpence or elevenpence to cover the postage, and thanked heaven. With less sincerity and infinitely more trouble they eventually thanked me.’

‘The Froplinsons don’t play bridge,’ said Egbert.

‘One is not supposed to notice social deformities of that sort,’ said Janetta; ‘it wouldn’t be polite. Besides, what trouble did they take to find out whether we read Wordsworth with gladness? For all they knew or cared we might be frantically embedded in the belief that all poetry begins and ends with John Masefield, and it might infuriate or depress us to have a daily sample of Wordsworthian products flung at us.’

‘Well, let’s get on with the letter,’ said Egbert. ‘How clever of you to guess that Wordsworth is our favourite poet.’

Again Janetta laid down her pen.

‘Do you realise what that means?’ she asked; ‘a Wordsworth booklet next Christmas, and another calendar the Christmas after, with the same problem of having to write suitable letters of thankfulness. No, the best thing to do is to drop all further allusion to the calendar and switch off on to some other topic.’

‘But what other topic?’

‘Oh, something like this: ‘What do you think of the New Year Honours List? A friend of ours made such a clever remark when he read it.’ Then you can stick in any remark that comes into your head; it needn’t be clever. The Froplinsons won’t know whether it is or isn’t.’

‘We don’t even know on which side they are in politics,’ objected Egbert; ‘and anyhow you can’t suddenly dismiss the subject of the calendar. Surely there must be some intelligent remark that can be made about it.’

‘Well, we can’t think of one,’ said Janetta wearily; ‘the fact is, we’ve both written ourselves out.’

There was a long silence, the forlorn silence of those who are bereft of hope and have almost ceased to care. Then Egbert started from his seat with an air of resolution. The light of battle was in his eyes.

‘Let me come to the writing-table,’ he exclaimed; ‘I’m going to write to the editor of every enlightened and influential newspaper in the Kingdom, I’m going to suggest that there should be a sort of epistolary Truce of God during the festivities of Christmas and New Year. From the twenty-fourth of December to the third or fourth of January it shall be considered an offence against good sense and good feeling to write or expect any letter or communication that does not deal with the necessary events of the moment. Answers to invitations, arrangements about trains, renewal of club subscriptions, and, of course, all the ordinary everyday affairs of business, sickness, engaging new cooks, and so forth, these will be dealt with in the usual manner as something inevitable. But all the devastating accretions of correspondence, incident to the festive season, these should be swept away to give the season a chance of being really festive.’

‘But you would have to make some acknowledgment of presents received,’ objected Janetta; ‘otherwise people would never know whether they had arrived safely.’

‘Of course, I have thought of that,’ said Egbert; ‘every present that was sent off would be accompanied by a ticket bearing the date of dispatch and the signature of the sender, and some conventional hieroglyphic to show that it was intended to be a Christmas or New Year gift; there would be a counterfoil with space for the recipient’s name and the date of arrival, and all you would have to do would be to sign and date the counterfoil, add a conventional hieroglyphic indicating heartfelt thanks and gratified surprise, put the thing into an envelope and post it.’

‘It sounds delightfully simple,’ said Janetta wistfully, ‘but people would consider it too perfunctory.’

‘It is not a bit more perfunctory than the present system,’ said Egbert; ‘I have only the same conventional language of gratitude at my disposal with which to thank dear old Colonel Chuttle for his perfectly delicious Stilton, which we shall devour to the last morsel, and the Froplinsons for their calendar, which we shall never look at. So you see the present system of acknowledgment is just as perfunctory and conventional as the counterfoil business would be, only ten times more tiresome and brain-racking.’

‘Your plan would certainly bring the idea of a Happy Christmas a step nearer realisation,’ said Janetta. ‘Meanwhile, what am I to say to the Froplinsons?’

(Adapted from ‘Down Pens’ by H. H. Munro)

12

Egbert and Janetta were writing

1) application letters.
2) thank-you letters.

3) letters of recrimination.
4) letters of complaint.

Ответ: .

13

Egbert and Janetta didn’t want to write a letter to the Froplinsons because they
1) had both written themselves out.
2) didn’t like this couple.
3) didn’t know what the Froplinsons had sent them.
4) had a lot of work to do.
Ответ: .

14

Janetta liked her present to the Froplinsons because it was

1) expensive and useless.
2) cheap and useless.

3) expensive and useful.
4) cheap and useful.

Ответ: .

15

Janetta didn’t want to mention that Wordsworth was their favourite poet because
1) she actually didn’t like his poems.
2) her favourite poet was John Masefield.
3) the Froplinsons would send them new Wordsworth-related presents.
4) she didn’t want the Froplinsons to know the truth.
Ответ: .

16

Janetta considered the Froplisons to be

1) stupid.

2) clever.

3) kind.

4) mean.

Ответ: .

17

Egbert suggested that at Christmas people should
1) stop writing letters at all.
2) put off all the everyday affairs of business.
3) not make any acknowledgment of received presents.
4) send counterfoils instead of thank-you letters.
Ответ: .

18

Janetta considered a new system

1) absolutely impossible.
2) too perfunctory.

3) easy to implement.
4) totally unacceptable.

Ответ: .

Раздел 3. ГРАММАТИКА И ЛЕКСИКА

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст. Преобразуйте, если необходимо, слова, напечатанные заглавными буквами в конце строк, обозначенных номерами 19—25, так, чтобы они грамматически соответствовали содержанию текстов. Заполните пропуски полученными словами. Каждый пропуск соответствует отдельному заданию из группы 19—25.

Обратите внимание, что по правилам ЕГЭ ответы нужно писать без пробелов и других знаков, например, правильный ответ ‘have done’ нужно будет записать как ‘havedone’, иначе ваш ответ не засчитается.

Swimming Pools

19

The first heated swimming pool by Gaius Maecenas of Rome in the first century BC.

CON-
STRUCT

20

Swimming pools became popular in Britain in the beginning of the 19th century. By 1837, London authorities six indoor pools with diving boards.

BUILD

21

The surviving swimming club in the world is the Arlington Baths Club in Glasgow. It is still an active club and continues to own its original Victorian building with a large pool.

OLD

22

After the start of modern Olympic Games in 1896, the popularity of swimming pools off. Nowadays there are lots of different swimming pools, both public and private.

TAKE

23

Most enjoy swimming and swimming pools with their wave-making machines, water slides and tropical vegetation are something unique for them.

CHILD

24

If they could, kids to spend their entire summer in the swimming pool.

CHOOSE

25

However, not everyone their own backyard pool.

HAVE

Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст. Образуйте от слов, напечатанных заглавными буквами в конце строк, обозначенных номерами 26—31, однокоренные слова так, чтобы они грамматически и лексически соответствовали содержанию текста. Заполните пропуски полученными словами. Каждый пропуск соответствует отдельному заданию из группы 26—31.

Waste Management

26

Waste affects our environment — everything that surrounds us including the air, water, land, plants, and man-made things. We need a healthy environment for our own health and .

HAPPY

27

The waste we create has to be controlled to be sure that it does not harm our environment and our health.

CAREFUL

28

So waste management is very important.

EFFECT

29

Waste reduction and recycling have a wide range of environmental benefits and promote public awareness and personal for the waste we create.

RESPON-
SIBLE

30

The best place to start making a is our home. Learn how you can reduce, reuse, and recycle materials to decrease household waste.

DIFFER

31

If we recycle what we can’t use any more, we save resources because the materials replace some of the natural resources including water and energy, which we use to make new products.

RECYCLE

Прочитайте текст с пропусками, обозначенными номерами 32—38. Эти номера соответствуют заданиям 32—38, в которых представлены возможные варианты ответов. Запишите в поле ответа цифру 1, 2, 3 или 4, соответствующую выбранному Вами варианту ответа.

Globalization and Communication Growth

The 21st century has 32____ in a new era in man’s ongoing quest for a better life and a better world. For the first time in history, we can now claim to live in ‘One World.’ Globalization has removed many of the gaps that have existed between and among nations. While the physical divide is still present, the 33____ of the Information Highway on how we communicate and live in the present day is simply staggering. Rapid improvements in information technology have allowed us to exchange information and communicate almost everywhere, anywhere, and anytime.

Globalization, as a general term, is best understood as the spread of ideas about the environment, democracy, human rights, and less complicated issues like fashion and fads. Global exchange is now taking place as the market of ideas, culture, and beliefs expand through the use of technology. The nature of business and how it is done has also improved by 34____ and bounds because of globalization.

An example of the remarkable effects of globalization is the invention of the telephone and the television. Television has enabled young people and adults to have the ability to share cultural and ethnic experiences with others. Telephones have also greatly improved communication. Gone are the weeks and even months of waiting for a letter. Anybody can talk to anyone who has another phone 35____ of distance or location on the planet. With the aid of satellites, 3rd generation phones allow us to make a phone call, send a video, or even receive an e-mail. These 36____ in communication have revolutionized business, commerce, and even the personal lives and relationships of millions of people.

Because of the electronic media, vast amounts of important information can reach any parts of the globe in 37____ time. Business establishments, whether big or small, are using the Internet in many ways to build or expand their company’s growth. With the ever improving technology come new markets, high 38____ for products, and also greater competition. Making investments in information and communication technology is now a must for any business enterprise.

32

1) started

2) began

3) ushered

4) launched

Ответ: .

33

1) cause

2) impact

3) consequences

4) result

Ответ: .

34

1) bonds

2) gaps

3) jumps

4) leaps

Ответ: .

35

1) regardless

2) despite

3) notwithstanding

4) because

Ответ: .

36

1) breakbeats

2) breakdowns

3) breakouts

4) breakthroughs

Ответ: .

37

1) any

2) no

3) none of

4) some

Ответ: .

38

1) access

2) claim

3) demand

4) rise

Ответ: .

Ваш результат: пока 0.

Далее вы можете набрать еще 40 баллов. Автоматически это проверить нельзя, поэтому сделайте реалистичный прогноз о том, сколько бы вы смогли набрать баллов, и получите ваш итоговый результат ЕГЭ.

Если возник вопрос по ответу, в котором вы ошиблись, можете задать его в комментариях.

Раздел 4. ПИСЬМО

Для ответов на задания 39 и 40 используйте бланк ответов № 2. Черновые пометки можно делать прямо на листе с заданиями, или можно использовать отдельный черновик. При выполнении заданий 39 и 40 особое внимание обратите на то, что Ваши ответы будут оцениваться только по записям, сделанным в БЛАНКЕ ОТВЕТОВ № 2. Никакие записи черновика не будут учитываться экспертом. Обратите внимание также на необходимость соблюдения указанного объёма текста. Тексты недостаточного объёма, а также часть текста, превышающая требуемый объём, не оцениваются. Запишите сначала номер задания (39, 40), а затем ответ на него. Если одной стороны бланка недостаточно, Вы можете использовать другую его сторону.

You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen friend Jessica who writes:

… By the way, we are doing a project at college on the fashion industry in different countries. It would be nice if you could tell me what clothes are popular with teenagers in Russia. Do you have any special fashion for teens? What kind of clothes do you prefer? Why?

As for me, I bought a new dress yesterday …

Write a letter to Jessica.
In your letter
— answer her questions
— ask 3 questions about her tastes in clothes
Write 100 — 140 words.
Remember the rules of letter writing.

За это задание вы можете получить 6 баллов максимум.

Comment on the following statement.

Lots of people enjoy celebrating holidays. However, for some people a holiday is just a day off.

What is your attitude to celebrations? Which way of celebrating holidays do you find more enjoyable?

Write 200 — 250 words.

— make an introduction (state the problem)
— express your personal opinion and give 2—3 reasons for your opinion
— express an opposing opinion and give 1—2 reasons for this opposing opinion
— explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion
— make a conclusion restating your position

За это задание вы можете получить 14 баллов максимум.

Раздел 5. ГОВОРЕНИЕ

— За 1,5 минуты нужно подготовиться и в следующие 1,5 минуты выразительно прочитать текст вслух — 1 балл.
— Составление 5 вопросов на основе ключевых слов. На подготовку отводится 1,5 минуты, затем каждый вопрос надо сформулировать в течение 20 секунд — 5 баллов.
— 3 фотографии. Нужно выбрать 1 и описать ее по предложенному тут же в задании плану за 3,5 минуты — 7 баллов.
— 2 картинки. Нужно сравнить их, описать сходства и различия, объяснить, почему выбранная тематика близка выпускнику, за 3,5 минуты — 7 баллов.


Прочитайте журнальную статью о книге и выполните задания 1 – 5, выбирая
букву
A, B, C или D. Установите
соответствие номера задания выбранному вами варианту ответа.

«A good
book for children should simply be a good book in its own right.» These are
the words of Mollie Hunter, a well-known author of books for youngsters. Born
and bred near Edinburgh,
Mollie has devoted her talents to writing primarily for young people. She
firmly believes that there is always and should always be a wider audience for
any good book whatever its main market. In Mollie’s opinion it is essential to
make full use of language and she enjoys telling a story, which is what every
writer should be doing: »If you aren’t telling a story, you’re a very dead
writer indeed,» she says.

When Mollie
was a child her home was still a village with buttercup meadows and strawberry
fields – sadly now covered with modern houses. «I was once taken back to
see it and I felt that somebody had lain dirty hands all over my childhood.
I’ll never go back,» she said. «Never.» »When I set one of my
books in Scotland,»
she said, «I can recapture my romantic feelings as a child playing in
those fields, or watching the village blacksmith at work. And that’s important,
because children now know so much so early that romance can’t exist for them,
as it did for us.»

To this day,
Mollie has a lively affection for children, which is reflected in the love she
has for her writing. «When we have visitors with children the adults
always say, «If you go to visit Mollie, she’ll spend more time with the
children.» Molly believes that parents don’t realize that children are
much more interesting company and always have something new and unexpected to
say.

1. In Mollie’s opinion a good book should

А) be attractive to a wide audience.

B) be attractive primarily to
youngsters.

C) be based on original ideas.

D) include a lot of description.

2. How does Mollie feel about what has
happened to her birthplace?

А) confused

B) ashamed

C) disappointed

D) surprised

3. In comparison with children of earlier
years, Mollie feels that modern children are

А) more romantic.

B) better informed.

C) less keen to learn.

D) less interested in fiction.

4. Mollie’s adult visitors generally discover
that she

А) is a lively person.

B) is interesting company.

C) talks a lot about her work.

D) pays more attention to their
children.

5. Mollie thinks that the parents

А) are not aware of their children’s
gifts.

B) overestimate their children’s
talents.

C) sometimes don’t understand what
their children say.

D) don’t spend much time with their
children.

Задание
2.
Прочитайте отрывок из романа и выполните задания 1 – 7,
выбирая букву
A,
B, C или D. Установите
соответствие номера задания выбранному вами варианту ответа.

I had first become acquainted with
my Italian friend by meeting him at certain great houses where he taught his
own language and I taught drawing. All I then knew of the history of his life
was that he had left Italy
for political reasons; and that he had been for many years respectably
established in London
as a teacher.

Without being actually a dwarf – for
he was perfectly well-proportioned from head to foot – Pesca was, I think, the
smallest human being I ever saw. Remarkable anywhere, by his personal appearance,
he was still further distinguished among the mankind by the eccentricity of his
character. The ruling idea of Peska’s life now was to show his gratitude to the
country that had given him a shelter by doing his utmost to turn himself into
an Englishman. The Professor aspired to become an Englishman in his habits and
amusements, as well as in his personal appearance. Finding us distinguished, as
a nation, by our love of athletic exercises, the little man, devoted himself to
all our English sports and pastimes, firmly persuaded that he could adopt our
national amusements by an effort of will the same way as he had adopted our
national gaiters and our national white hat.

I had seen him risk his limbs
blindly
unlike others at a fox-hunt and in a cricket field; and soon
afterwards I saw him risk his life, just as blindly, in the sea at Brighton.

We had met there accidentally, and
were bathing together. If we had been engaged in any exercise peculiar to my
own nation I should, of course, have looked after Pesca carefully; but as
foreigners are generally quite as well able to take care of themselves in the
water as Englishmen, it never occurred to me that the art of swimming might
merely add one more to the list of manly exercises which the Professor believed
that he could learn on the spot. Soon after we had both struck out from shore,
I stopped, finding my friend did not
follow me, and turned round to look for him. To my horror and amazement,
I saw nothing between me and the beach but two little white arms which
struggled for an instant above the surface of the water, and then disappeared
from view. When I dived for him, the poor little man was lying quietly at the
bottom, looking smaller than I had ever seen him look before.

When he had thoroughly recovered himself,
his warm Southern nature broke through all artificial English restraints in a
moment. He overwhelmed me with the wildest expressions of affection and in his
exaggerated Italian way declared that he should never be happy again until he
rendered me some service which I might remember to the end of my days.

Little did I think then – little did
I think afterwards – that the opportunity of serving me was soon to come; that
he was eagerly to seize it on the instant; and that by so doing he was to turn
the whole current of my existence into a new channel. Yet so it was. If I had
not dived for Professor Pesca when he lay under water, I should never, perhaps,
have heard even the name of the woman, who now directs the purpose of my life.

1. Peska taught

A) drawing.

B) Italian.

C) English.

D) politics.

2.
Peska impressed people by being

A) well-built.

B) well-mannered.

C) strange.

D) ill-mannered.

3.
Peska tried to become a true Englishman because he

A) was thankful to the country that had
adopted him.

B) enjoyed Englishman’s pastimes and
amusements.

C) loved the way the English did
athletic exercises.

D) was fond of the eccentric fashions
of the English.

4.
‘… risk his limbs blindly’ means Peska

A) didn’t look where he went.

B) was
unaware of danger from others.

C) caused
a problem for others.

D) acted rather thoughtlessly.

5.
The author didn’t look after Peska carefully because

A) they both had been engaged in the
peculiar English exercise.

B) foreigners were generally bathing
not far from the shore.

C) the author was sure that Peska would
learn swimming on the spot.

D) the author was sure that Peska was a
very good swimmer.

6.
Peska wanted to do the author some favour as

A) it was in his warm nature.

B) the author had saved his life.

C) the author was his best friend.

D) he wanted to look English.

7.
Peska managed to

A) change the author’s life completely.

B) become English to the core.

C) meet a woman who later directed his
life.

D) turn his existence into a new
channel.

Задание 3. Прочитайте отрывок из
романа и выполните задания 1 – 7, выбирая букву
A, B, C или D. Установите
соответствие номера задания выбранному вами варианту ответа.

Pitcher, a confidential clerk in the
office of Harvey Maxwell, allowed a look of mild interest and surprise when his
employer briskly entered at half-past nine in company with a young lady. Miss
Leslie had been Maxwell’s stenographer for a year. She was beautiful in a way
that was decidedly unstenographic. On this morning she was softly and shyly
radiant. Her eyes were dreamily bright, her expression a happy one, tinged with
reminiscence. Pitcher, still mildly curious, noticed a difference in her ways
this morning. Instead of going straight into the adjoining room, where her desk
was, she stayed for a while, slightly irresolute, in the outer office. Once she
moved over by Maxwell’s desk near enough for him to be aware of her presence.

The man sitting at that desk was no
longer a man; it was a machine, moved by buzzing wheels and uncoiling springs.

“Well – what is it? Anything?” asked
Maxwell sharply.

“Nothing,” answered the
stenographer, moving away with a little smile.

This day was Harvey Maxwell’s busy
day. Messenger boys ran in and out with messages and telegrams. Maxwell himself
jumped from desk to door sweating. On the Exchange there were
hurricanes and snowstorms and volcanoes
, and those powerful disturbances
were reproduced in miniature in Maxwell’s office. The rush and pace of business
grew faster and fiercer. Share prices were falling and orders to sell them were
coming and going and the man was working like some strong machine. Here was a
world of finance, and there was no room in it for the human world or the world
of nature.

When the luncheon hour came, Maxwell
stood by his desk with a fountain pen over his right ear. His window was open.
And through the window came a delicate, sweet smell of lilac that fixed the
broker for a moment immovable. For this odour belonged to Miss Leslie; it was
her own, and hers only. She was in the next room – twenty steps away.

“By George, I’ll do it now,” said
Maxwell half aloud. “ I’ll ask her now. I wonder why I didn’t do it long ago.”
He dashed into the inner office and charged upon the desk of the stenographer.
She looked at him with a smile.

“Miss Leslie,” he began hurriedly,
“I have but a moment to spare. I want to say something in that moment. Will you
be my wife? I haven’t had time to approach you in the ordinary way, but I
really do love you.”

“Oh, what are you talking about?”
exclaimed the young lady. She rose to her feet and gazed upon him, round-eyed.

“Don’t you understand?” said
Maxwell. “I want you to marry me. I love you, Miss Leslie. I wanted to tell
you, and I snatched a minute. They are calling me for the phone now. Tell them
to wait a minute, Pitcher. Won’t you, Miss Leslie?”

The stenographer acted very
strangely. She seemed overcome with amazement; then tears flowed from her
wondering eyes; and then she smiled sunnily through them.

“I know now,” she said softly. “It
is this old business that has driven everything else out of your head for the
time. I was frightened at first. Don’t you remember, Harvey? We were married last evening at 8
o’clock in the Little Church Around the Corner.”

1. Harvey Maxwell was

A) a stenographer.

B) a clerk.

C) Pitcher’s boss.

D) Pitcher’s partner.

2. Pitcher was mildly interested and
surprised because

A) Miss Leslie moved decidedly to Maxwell’s desk.

B) Miss Leslie arrived with Maxwell.

C) Maxwell came late at half past ten.

D) Maxwell looked irresolute that morning.

3. It was Harvey Maxwell’s hard day because

A) he had no one to help him.

B) all messenger boys had gone.

C) the weather was hot.

D) the Exchange was a busy place.

4. ‘On the Exchange there were hurricanes and
snowstorms and volcanoes’ means

A) the Exchange was about to be
destroyed.

B) the financial situation was
difficult.

C) natural disasters often happened
in that area.

D) those were powerful disturbances
of nature.

5. Maxwell dashed into the inner office at
lunch time because

A) he liked the lilac smell.

B) the smell reminded him of Miss
Leslie.

C) Pitcher called him for a phone
call.

D) he needed to send a message.

6. Harvey Maxwell made a proposal between
phone calls because he

A) was rather pressed for time.

B) used to make business proposals
in such a way.

C) always acted very strangely.

D) was afraid Miss Leslie would
leave him.

7. Miss Leslie was astonished by the proposal
because

A) she had never heard anyone make
it in such a way.

B) she had never expected it from
Harvey Maxwell.

C) she had married the man the day
before.

D) it came too quickly and without
warning.

Ответы к заданиям по
чтению ( высокий уровень)

  1. 1-A, 2-C, 3-B, 4-D, 5-A
  2. 1-B; 2-C; 3-A; 4-D; 5-D; 6-B; 7-A
  3. 1-C; 2-B; 3-D; 4-B; 5-B; 6-A; 7-C

  • ВСЕ НОВИНКИ

Электронная библиотека » Елена Музланова » Английский язык. Экспресс-репетитор для подготовки к ЕГЭ. «Грамматика и лексика» » онлайн чтение — страница 8

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Часть 1. Чтение

I. Установите соответствие между заголовками A – Н и текстами 1 – 7. Занесите свои ответы в таблицу. Используйте каждую букву только один раз. В задании один заголовок лишний.

A. Supercomputer

B. Human intelligence test

C. Man against computer

D. Robotic industry

E. Intelligent machines in our life

F. Computer intelligence test

G. Computers change human brains

H. Electronic film stars

1. Artificial intelligence is the art of making machines that are able to ‘think’. We often don’t notice it, but artificial intelligence is all around us. It is present in computer games, in the cruise control in our cars and the servers that direct our e-mail. Some scientists believe that the most powerful computers could have the power of the human brain. Machines have always been excellent at tasks like calculation. But now they are better than humans in many spheres, from chess to mixing music.

2. The world’s most powerful computer is ASCI Purple, made by IBM in 2004. It can carry out 100 trillion operations per second and has the size of two basketball courts. A computer with double power is expected in the next two years. A spokesman for IBM said that ASCI Purple is near the power of the human brain. But some scientists believe our brains can carry out almost 10,000 trillion operations per second.

3. The possible dangers of intelligent machines became the stories of many science fiction films. In The Terminator (1984), a computer network uses nuclear weapons against the human race in order to rule the world. This network then makes intelligent robots called ‘Terminators’ which it programs to kill all the humans. In The Matrix (1999) and The Matrix Reloaded (2003), a machine dominates humanity, using people as batteries to power itself.

4. In 1997, then the world chess champion Garry Kasparov played against IBM’s Deep Blue supercomputer – and lost. After six games, the world-famous Kasparov lost 2.5 to 3.5 to the computer. In February 2003, Kasparov restored human reputation by finishing equal against the Israeli-built supercomputer Deep Junior. Kasparov ended the game with the score 2-2 against US company X3D Technologies’ supercomputer X3D Fritz in November 2003, proving that the human brain can keep up with the latest developments in computing (at least in chess).

5. There are a number of different methods which try to measure intelligence, the most famous of which is perhaps the IQ, or ‘Intelligence Quotient’ test. This test was first used in early 20th century Paris. The modern day IQ test measures a variety of different types of ability such as memory for words and figures and others. Whether IQ tests actually test general intelligence is disputable. Some argue that they just show how good the individual is at IQ tests!

6. Analysis shows that human intelligence is changing. We are gaining abilities in some areas of intelligence, while losing them in others, such as memory. So this generation may not remember the great number of poems, their abilities are greater in other areas. It has been discovered that wide use of video games improves reaction time. But we could only dream of computing without calculators as fast as our grandparents did.

7. In 1950, mathematician Alan Turing invented a test to check machine intelligence. In the Turing Test, two people (A and B) sit in a closed room, a third person (C), who asks questions, sits outside. Person A tries to answer the questions so that person C doesn’t guess who they are: men or women, while person B tries to help him (C) in their identification. Turing suggested a machine take the place of person A. If the machine fooled the human, it was likely to be intelligent.

II. Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски 1 – 6 частями предложений, обозначенными буквами A – G. Одна из частей в списке А – G лишняя. Занесите букву, обозначающую соответствующую часть предложения, в таблицу.

Walking is not enough to keep fit

Walking may not be enough on its own to produce significant health benefits, research suggests. A team from Canada’s University of Alberta compared a 10,000-step exercise programme with a more traditional fitness regime of moderate intensity. Researchers found improvements 1_______________________ were significantly higher in the second group. They told an American College of Sports Medicine meeting that gentle exercise was 2 _______________________. In total 128 people took 3 _______________________. The researchers assessed influence on fitness by measuring blood pressure and lung capacity. They found out the 10,000-step programme did help to get people motivated – and was an excellent way to start 4 _______________________. But to increase the effectiveness, some intensity must be added to their exercise. “Across your day, while you are achieving those 10,000 steps, take 200 to 400 of them at a faster pace. You’ve got to do more than light exercise and include regular moderate activity, and don’t be shy to have an occasional period of time at an energetic level.” The researchers were concerned there was too much focus 5 _______________________, rather than on its intensity.

Professor Stuart Biddle, an expert in exercise science at the University of Loughborough, said it was possible that the current guidelines on how much exercise to take were set too low. “However, you have got to find 6 _______________________. The harder you make it, the fewer people will actually do it.” Professor Biddle said there was no doubt that energetic exercise was the way to get fit, but volume rather than intensity might be more useful in tackling issues such as obesity.

A. part in the project

B. taking exercise

C. gave marked health benefits

D. in fitness levels

E. on simply getting people to take exercise

F. not enough to get fit

G. a compromise between physiology and psychology

III. Прочитайте журнальную статью о книге и выполните задания 1 – 5, выбирая букву A, B, C или D. Установите соответствие номера задания выбранному вами варианту ответа. Занесите свои ответы в таблицу.

«A good book for children should simply be a good book in its own right.» These are the words of Mollie Hunter, a well-known author of books for youngsters. Born and bred near Edinburgh, Mollie has devoted her talents to writing primarily for young people. She firmly believes that there is always and should always be a wider audience for any good book whatever its main market. In Mollie’s opinion it is essential to make full use of language and she enjoys telling a story, which is what every writer should be doing: »If you aren’t telling a story, you’re a very dead writer indeed,» she says.

When Mollie was a child her home was still a village with buttercup meadows and strawberry fields – sadly now covered with modern houses. «I was once taken back to see it and I felt that somebody had lain dirty hands all over my childhood. I’ll never go back,» she said. «Never.» »When I set one of my books in Scotland,» she said, «I can recapture my romantic feelings as a child playing in those fields, or watching the village blacksmith at work. And that’s important, because children now know so much so early that romance can’t exist for them, as it did for us.»

To this day, Mollie has a lively affection for children, which is reflected in the love she has for her writing. «When we have visitors with children the adults always say, «If you go to visit Mollie, she’ll spend more time with the children.» Molly believes that parents don’t realize that children are much more interesting company and always have something new and unexpected to say.

1. In Mollie’s opinion a good book should

А) be attractive to a wide audience.

B) be attractive primarily to youngsters.

C) be based on original ideas.

D) include a lot of description.

2. How does Mollie feel about what has happened to her birthplace?

А) confused

B) ashamed

C) disappointed

D) surprised

3. In comparison with children of earlier years, Mollie feels that modern children are

А) more romantic.

B) better informed.

C) less keen to learn.

D) less interested in fiction.

4. Mollie’s adult visitors generally discover that she

А) is a lively person.

B) is interesting company.

C) talks a lot about her work.

D) pays more attention to their children.

5. Mollie thinks that the parents

А) are not aware of their children’s gifts.

B) overestimate their children’s talents.

C) sometimes don’t understand what their children say.

D) don’t spend much time with their children.

Часть 2. Грамматика и лексика

I. Прочитайте приведённый ниже текст. Преобразуйте слова, напечатанные заглавными буквами в конце строк, обозначенных номерами 1 – 7, так чтобы они грамматически соответствовали содержанию текста. Заполните пропуски полученными словами. Каждый пропуск соответствует отдельному заданию из группы 1 – 7. Занесите свои ответы в таблицу.

Modern world of sports knows many kinds of gymnastics. One of them, rhythmic gymnastics 1__________________ out of modern gymnastics and the Swedish system of free exercise in the 19-th century.

GROW

It was called “aesthetic gymnastics” as the students 2__________________ express feelings and emotions through body movement. It combined elements of ballet, gymnastics, and theatrical dance.

CAN

Young 3__________________ exercised to music, moving from simple calisthenics to more energetic activities. A growing number of men are participating in this kind of sport now.

WOMAN

In the 1880s in Switzerland various exercises to music were created. They were designed to give grace of movement, and a much 4________________ pose.

GOOD

A degree of difficulty for each movement 5__________________ by the European Sport Association after the World War I. So all the elements were graded accordingly.

DEVELOP

In 1906 rhythmic gymnastics was introduced to North America, but the sport 6__________________ much popularity

NOT GAIN

Ten European countries 7__________________ part in the first world championship, held in 1973 in Budapest, Hungary. The United States did not begin competing in the biennial world championship until 1973.

TAKE

Часть 3. Письмо

I. Write an essay.

Why do we learn the foreign languages?

Write about 200 words.

Use the following plan:

1. Introduction (State the problem).

2. Express your opinion and support your point with arguments.

3. Give other people’s arguments and explain why you don’t agree.

4. Make a conclusion.

10–11 класс

Ключи к заданиям

Часть 1. Аудирование

I.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

T

F

T

T

T

F

T

T

F

T

Часть 2. Чтение

I.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

E

A

H

C

B

G

F

II.

III.

Часть 3. Грамматика и лексика

I.

1

grew

2

could

3

women

4

better

5

was developed

6

didn’t gain<или>did not gain

7

took

Задание 1.

 Прочитайте журнальную статью о книге и выполните задания 1 – 5, выбирая букву A, B, C или D. Установите соответствие номера задания выбранному вами варианту ответа.

«A good book for children should simply be a good book in its own right.» These are the words of Mollie Hunter, a well-known author of books for youngsters. Born and bred near Edinburgh, Mollie has devoted her talents to writing primarily for young people. She firmly believes that there is always and should always be a wider audience for any good book whatever its main market. In Mollie’s opinion it is essential to make full use of language and she enjoys telling a story, which is what every writer should be doing: »If you aren’t telling a story, you’re a very dead writer indeed,» she says.

When Mollie was a child her home was still a village with buttercup meadows and strawberry fields – sadly now covered with modern houses. «I was once taken back to see it and I felt that somebody had lain dirty hands all over my childhood. I’ll never go back,» she said. «Never.» »When I set one of my books in Scotland,» she said, «I can recapture my romantic feelings as a child playing in those fields, or watching the village blacksmith at work. And that’s important, because children now know so much so early that romance can’t exist for them, as it did for us.»

To this day, Mollie has a lively affection for children, which is reflected in the love she has for her writing. «When we have visitors with children the adults always say, «If you go to visit Mollie, she’ll spend more time with the children.» Molly believes that parents don’t realize that children are much more interesting company and always have something new and unexpected to say.

  1. In Mollie’s opinion a good book should

А) be attractive to a wide audience.

B) be attractive primarily to youngsters.

C) be based on original ideas.

D) include a lot of description.

     2. How does Mollie feel about what has happened to her birthplace?

А) confused

B) ashamed

C) disappointed

D) surprised

  1. In comparison with children of earlier years, Mollie feels that modern children are

А) more romantic.

B) better informed.

C) less keen to learn.

D) less interested in fiction.

  1. Mollie’s adult visitors generally discover that she

А) is a lively person.

B) is interesting company.

C) talks a lot about her work.

D) pays more attention to their children.

  1. Mollie thinks that the parents

А) are not aware of their children’s gifts.

B) overestimate their children’s talents.

C) sometimes don’t understand what their children say.

D) don’t spend much time with their children.

Задание 2.

Прочитайте отрывок из романа и выполните задания 1 – 7, выбирая букву A, B, C или D. Установите соответствие номера задания выбранному вами варианту ответа.

I had first become acquainted with my Italian friend by meeting him at certain great houses where he taught his own language and I taught drawing. All I then knew of the history of his life was that he had left Italy for political reasons; and that he had been for many years respectably established in London as a teacher.

Without being actually a dwarf – for he was perfectly well-proportioned from head to foot – Pesca was, I think, the smallest human being I ever saw. Remarkable anywhere, by his personal appearance, he was still further distinguished among the mankind by the eccentricity of his character. The ruling idea of Peska’s life now was to show his gratitude to the country that had given him a shelter by doing his utmost to turn himself into an Englishman. The Professor aspired to become an Englishman in his habits and amusements, as well as in his personal appearance. Finding us distinguished, as a nation, by our love of athletic exercises, the little man, devoted himself to all our English sports and pastimes, firmly persuaded that he could adopt our national amusements by an effort of will the same way as he had adopted our national gaiters and our national white hat.

I had seen him risk his limbs blindly unlike others at a fox-hunt and in a cricket field; and soon afterwards I saw him risk his life, just as blindly, in the sea at Brighton.

We had met there accidentally, and were bathing together. If we had been engaged in any exercise peculiar to my own nation I should, of course, have looked after Pesca carefully; but as foreigners are generally quite as well able to take care of themselves in the water as Englishmen, it never occurred to me that the art of swimming might merely add one more to the list of manly exercises which the Professor believed that he could learn on the spot. Soon after we had both struck out from shore, I stopped, finding my friend did not
follow me, and turned round to look for him. To my horror and amazement,
I saw nothing between me and the beach but two little white arms which struggled for an instant above the surface of the water, and then disappeared from view. When I dived for him, the poor little man was lying quietly at the bottom, looking smaller than I had ever seen him look before.

When he had thoroughly recovered himself, his warm Southern nature broke through all artificial English restraints in a moment. He overwhelmed me with the wildest expressions of affection and in his exaggerated Italian way declared that he should never be happy again until he rendered me some service which I might remember to the end of my days.

Little did I think then – little did I think afterwards – that the opportunity of serving me was soon to come; that he was eagerly to seize it on the instant; and that by so doing he was to turn the whole current of my existence into a new channel. Yet so it was. If I had not dived for Professor Pesca when he lay under water, I should never, perhaps, have heard even the name of the woman, who now directs the purpose of my life.

     1. Peska taught

A) drawing.

B) Italian.

C) English.

D) politics.

  1. Peska impressed people by being

A) well-built.

B) well-mannered.

C) strange.

D) ill-mannered.

  1. Peska tried to become a true Englishman because he

A) was thankful to the country that had adopted him.

B) enjoyed Englishman’s pastimes and amusements.

C) loved the way the English did athletic exercises.

D) was fond of the eccentric fashions of the English.

  1. ‘… risk his limbs blindly’ means Peska

A) didn’t look where he went.

B) was unaware of danger from others.

C) caused a problem for others.

D) acted rather thoughtlessly.

      5. The author didn’t look after Peska carefully because

A) they both had been engaged in the peculiar English exercise.

B) foreigners were generally bathing not far from the shore.

C) the author was sure that Peska would learn swimming on the spot.

D) the author was sure that Peska was a very good swimmer.

  1. Peska wanted to do the author some favour as

A) it was in his warm nature.

B) the author had saved his life.

C) the author was his best friend.

D) he wanted to look English.

  1. Peska managed to

A) change the author’s life completely.

B) become English to the core.

C) meet a woman who later directed his life.

D) turn his existence into a new channel.

Задание 3. 

Прочитайте отрывок из романа и выполните задания 1 – 7, выбирая букву A, B, C или D. Установите соответствие номера задания выбранному вами варианту ответа.

Pitcher, a confidential clerk in the office of Harvey Maxwell, allowed a look of mild interest and surprise when his employer briskly entered at half-past nine in company with a young lady. Miss Leslie had been Maxwell’s stenographer for a year. She was beautiful in a way that was decidedly unstenographic. On this morning she was softly and shyly radiant. Her eyes were dreamily bright, her expression a happy one, tinged with reminiscence. Pitcher, still mildly curious, noticed a difference in her ways this morning. Instead of going straight into the adjoining room, where her desk was, she stayed for a while, slightly irresolute, in the outer office. Once she moved over by Maxwell’s desk near enough for him to be aware of her presence.

The man sitting at that desk was no longer a man; it was a machine, moved by buzzing wheels and uncoiling springs.

“Well – what is it? Anything?” asked Maxwell sharply.

“Nothing,” answered the stenographer, moving away with a little smile.

This day was Harvey Maxwell’s busy day. Messenger boys ran in and out with messages and telegrams. Maxwell himself jumped from desk to door sweating. On the Exchange there were hurricanes and snowstorms and volcanoes, and those powerful disturbances were reproduced in miniature in Maxwell’s office. The rush and pace of business grew faster and fiercer. Share prices were falling and orders to sell them were coming and going and the man was working like some strong machine. Here was a world of finance, and there was no room in it for the human world or the world of nature.

When the luncheon hour came, Maxwell stood by his desk with a fountain pen over his right ear. His window was open. And through the window came a delicate, sweet smell of lilac that fixed the broker for a moment immovable. For this odour belonged to Miss Leslie; it was her own, and hers only. She was in the next room – twenty steps away.

“By George, I’ll do it now,” said Maxwell half aloud. “ I’ll ask her now. I wonder why I didn’t do it long ago.” He dashed into the inner office and charged upon the desk of the stenographer. She looked at him with a smile.

“Miss Leslie,” he began hurriedly, “I have but a moment to spare. I want to say something in that moment. Will you be my wife? I haven’t had time to approach you in the ordinary way, but I really do love you.”

“Oh, what are you talking about?” exclaimed the young lady. She rose to her feet and gazed upon him, round-eyed.

“Don’t you understand?” said Maxwell. “I want you to marry me. I love you, Miss Leslie. I wanted to tell you, and I snatched a minute. They are calling me for the phone now. Tell them to wait a minute, Pitcher. Won’t you, Miss Leslie?”

The stenographer acted very strangely. She seemed overcome with amazement; then tears flowed from her wondering eyes; and then she smiled sunnily through them.

“I know now,” she said softly. “It is this old business that has driven everything else out of your head for the time. I was frightened at first. Don’t you remember, Harvey? We were married last evening at 8 o’clock in the Little Church Around the Corner.”

1. Harvey Maxwell was

A) a stenographer.

B) a clerk.

C) Pitcher’s boss.

D) Pitcher’s partner.

2. Pitcher was mildly interested and surprised because

A) Miss Leslie moved decidedly to Maxwell’s desk.

B) Miss Leslie arrived with Maxwell.

C) Maxwell came late at half past ten.

D) Maxwell looked irresolute that morning.

3. It was Harvey Maxwell’s hard day because

A) he had no one to help him.

B) all messenger boys had gone.

C) the weather was hot.

D) the Exchange was a busy place.

4. ‘On the Exchange there were hurricanes and snowstorms and volcanoes’ means

A) the Exchange was about to be destroyed.

B) the financial situation was difficult.

C) natural disasters often happened in that area.

D) those were powerful disturbances of nature.

5. Maxwell dashed into the inner office at lunch time because

A) he liked the lilac smell.

B) the smell reminded him of Miss Leslie.

C) Pitcher called him for a phone call.

D) he needed to send a message.

6. Harvey Maxwell made a proposal between phone calls because he

A) was rather pressed for time.

B) used to make business proposals in such a way.

C) always acted very strangely.

D) was afraid Miss Leslie would leave him.

7. Miss Leslie was astonished by the proposal because

A) she had never heard anyone make it in such a way.

B) she had never expected it from Harvey Maxwell.

C) she had married the man the day before.

D) it came too quickly and without warning.

Задание 4.

Прочитайте отрывок из романа и выполните задания 1 – 7, выбирая букву A, B, C или D. Установите соответствие номера задания выбранному вами варианту ответа.

The London Marathon celebrates its 23rd birthday. That is 23 years of stresses and strains, blisters and sore bits, and incredible tales. Somehow, yours truly has managed to run four of them. And I have medals to prove it. It seemed like a good idea at the time. I watched the inaugural London Marathon on March 29th, 1981. It seemed extraordinary that normal people would want to run 26 miles and 385 yards. And, it must be said, they looked strange and not quite steady at the end of it all. There are, indeed, terrible tales of people losing consciousness by the time they reach that glorious finishing line. But I was captivated. I knew I had to do it.

Three years later I was living in London, not far from Greenwich where the event begins, and it seemed the perfect opportunity to give it a go. I was only a short train ride from the starting line, but more than 26 miles from the finish. “Who cares?” I thought. By the end I did. The moment I crossed that finishing line, and had that medal placed around my neck, was one of the finest in my life. The sense of achievement was immense. It was a mad thing to do, and ultimately pointless. But knowing that I’d run a Marathon – that most historic of all distant races – felt incredible.

London provides one of the easiest of all the officially sanctioned marathons because most of it is flat. Yes, there are the cobblestones while running through the Tower of London, and there are the quiet patches where crowds are thin and you are crying out for some encouragement – those things matter to the alleged “fun” runners like myself, the serious runners don’t think of such things.

This year London will attract unprecedented number of athletes, a lot of title holders among them. It is set to witness what is probably the greatest field ever for a marathon. In the men’s race, for example, among numerous applicants there’s the holder of the world’s best time, Khalid Khannouchi of the USA; the defending champion El Mouriz of Morocco; Ethiopia’s Olympic bronze-medallist Tesfaye Tola. And, making his marathon debut, is one of the finest long distance runners of all time Haile Gebrselassie.

Since 1981, almost half a million people have completed the London Marathon, raising more than $125 million for charity. For the majority of the runners, this is what it is all about. It is for charity, for fun, for self-development. It is a wonderful day. I have run it with poor training, with proper training. And I have always loved it.

It’s crazy, and it’s one of the greatest things I’ve ever done. If you want to feel as though you’ve achieved something, run a marathon.

1. Participation in the London Marathon resulted for the author in

A) stresses and strains.

B) blisters and sore bits.

C) memorable medals.

D) incredible tales.

2. When the author watched the end of the first marathon he saw people who were

A) extraordinary steady.

B) feeling weak and exhausted.

C) losing consciousness.

D) having a glorious time.

3. The reason for the author’s participation in the marathon was the fact that he

A) was fascinated by it.

B) lived not far from its finishing line.

C) wanted to receive a medal.

D) wanted to do something incredible.

4. “By the end I did” means that the author

A) found the distance suitable.

B) found the distance challenging.

C) decided to take part in the marathon.

D) eventually took a train to the finish.

5. According to the author, the London Marathon is one of the easiest because

A) it goes through the Tower of London.

B) there are quiet patches without crowds.

C) many “fun” runners participate in it.

D) its course does not slope up or down.

6. “… the greatest field ever for a marathon” means that the marathon

A) will take place on a big field.

B) is to be run by the famous runners only.

C) will be witnessed by more people.

D) will welcome a huge number of sportsmen.

7. According to the author, one should run the London Marathon to

A) raise money for charity.

B) get some training.

C) feel self-fulfillment.

D) have fun in a crazy way.

Ответы к заданиям

  1. 1-A, 2-C, 3-B, 4-D, 5-A
  2. 1-B; 2-C; 3-A; 4-D; 5-D; 6-B; 7-A
  3. 1-C; 2-B; 3-D; 4-B; 5-B; 6-A; 7-C
  4. 1-C; 2-B; 3-A; 4-B; 5-D; 6-D; 7-C